The world has lost around 3.6 million hectares (ha) of mangroves since 1980, equivalent to an alarming 20 percent loss of total mangrove area according to FAO’s recent mangrove assessment study, entitled The world’s mangroves 1980-2005. In China alone, the last 50 years have seen a 70 percent loss of mangrove forests. The key findings of the report were presented today at the Conference of the Parties to the Ramsar Convention on Wetlands, which began yesterday in Kampala, Uganda (8-15 November 2005). Since 1980, about one-fifth of the world’s mangroves have disappeared. Most mangroves grow on public land, only about 1 percent of which receives any sort of protection. There is 13% less mangrove forest around the world than thought. Around 20 percent of the world’s mangrove forests have disappeared during the past 25 years as a result of over-exploitation and conversion to other uses, according to a new FAO study. More than 35% of the world’s mangroves are already gone. It is prepared by FAO in collaboration with mangrove specialists throughout the world and is co-funded by the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO). Twenty percent of the world's mangroves lost over the last 25 years: Rate of deforestation slowing, but still a cause for alarm 9 November 2005, Rome - Around 20 percent of the world's mangrove forests have disappeared during the past 25 years as a result of over-exploitation and conversion to other uses, according to a new FAO study. Research has shown that mangroves account for only 3 percent of global forest cover. Our study confirms earlier findings that the biogeographic distribution of mangroves is generally confined to the tropical and subtropical regions and the largest percentage of mangroves is found between 5° N and 5° S latitude. B. This means that mangrove loss can have a large effect; up to 10 percent of global carbon emissions from deforestation has been attributed to mangroves. Mangrove forests thrive near the mouths of large rivers where river deltas provide lots of sediment … Mangrove forests provide habitat for thousands of species at all levels of marine and forest food webs, from bacteria to barnacles to Bengal tigers. Along the Atlantic coast they are found from Florida all the way down to Argentina. A mangrove is a shrub or small tree that grows in coastal saline or brackish water.The term is also used for tropical coastal vegetation consisting of such species. Mangroves are commonly found along sheltered coastlines in the tropics and sub-tropics where they fulfil important socio-economic and environmental functions. Approximately how many hectares of Mangrove forests can be found around the world? They stretch into India, Burma, and south-east Asia. Mangrove forests are considered hardy plants given their ability to survive in high saline waters and low-oxygen soils. Millions of fishermen, farmers and others depend on them as a source of wood, medicinal plants, and food. As new cities are developed, mangrove forests around the world have felt a great impact not only on their ecosystems health, but also their wave-attenuating capacity. Mangrove forests, consisting of multiple taxa of tropical macrophytes, are distributed mainly in tropical and subtropical regions of the world [1,2,3].The upper latitudinal limits of global distribution, extending into the temperate regions, are characterized by decreased abundance, reduced species diversity, and decreased tree vigor, growth, and biomass (Figure 1). Most of the closed-canopy forests in Kenya are montane forests that are also the nation’s water towers. 275,000. Today, one of the direst threats to their continued existence … Fifty percent of the world’s mangroves have disappeared in the past half-century, victims of rising sea levels; oil spills and other pollution; demand for timber; and clearing to make way for shrimp and crab fishing, coastal infrastructure, and urban expansion. Asia has the largest area of mangroves, followed by Africa and South America. Mangroves also provide ideal locations for aquaculture, which is currently “the fastest growing food-producing sector in the world”, though often mangrove forests are destroyed for this purpose. Aim Our scientific understanding of the extent and distribution of mangrove forests of the world is inadequate. The following is a news release from FAO detailing its mangrove study. Read about the Mangrove importance, cover and conservation in India. Approximately 118 countries around the world hold a mangrove forest with the largest percentage located in Asia (42%). Mangroves constitute only 0.5 percent of forest area worldwide, but millions of people depend on them for food, income and protection of coastlines against erosion. The biggest concentration (21 percent) of the world's mangroves is in Indonesia, with Brazil home to around nine percent and Australia, seven percent. These areas usually get rain year-round, typically more than 70 inches (1,800 millimeters) a year, according to the Encyclopedia Britannica. The bad news: Mangroves face numerous threats — 35% were lost between 1980 and 2000, and since the turn of the 21st century almost 1 in 50 of the remaining mangrove forests has been cut down. 1. 50,000. The report, to be published next January, will provide an overview on mangrove vegetation and species, uses and threats in addition to information on mangrove areas and area changes over time. Because they are located in coastal zones, where population densities are typically high, mangrove areas are frequently converted to other uses, including fish and shrimp-farming, agriculture, salt production and urban development. Despite the incredible value that these ecosystems provide, mangrove forests are vanishing at an alarming rate and could be wiped out forever. Mangroves in India are 3 percent of its total geographical area. In China alone, the last 50 years have seen a 70 percent loss of mangrove forests. The largest mangrove forest in the world is Sundarban Mangrove Forest. Mangroves are found in more than 120 countries and territories around the world, but the UN agency noted that close to half of the total mangrove area is found in just five countries: Indonesia, Australia, Brazil, Nigeria and Mexico. The total area is nearly 10,000 km2. Wave energy may be reduced by 75 per cent in the wave's passage through 200 meters of mangrove forests, a very substantial amount once the mangrove has been removed. Our biweekly podcast delivering news & inspiration from nature’s frontline. Main conclusions We report that the remaining area of mangrove forest in the world is less than previously thought. The present chapter deals with the current status of research on mangrove-inhabiting fauna, threats and conservation in India. These unique forest ecosystems provide a number of additional environmental benefits, as well. Approximately 75 percent of the world’s mangrove forests are found in just 15 countries. An estimated 75 percent of commercially caught fish spend some time in the mangroves or depend on food webs that can be traced back to these coastal forests. Introduction. Mangroves are being lost to a variety of impacts, including … When mangrove forests are destroyed, drops in local fish catches often result. The term \"rainforest\" has a wide classification. She and her colleagues found that mangrove loss rates had plummeted 73 percent globally since 2000. The analysis shows that around 75 percent of the Sundarbans has become greener over the last 30 years and no significant decrease in forest area was found over that time. Mangroves today cover around 15 million hectares (ha) worldwide, down from 18.8 million ha in 1980, according to the study. The bad news: Mangroves face numerous threats — 35% were lost between 1980 and 2000, and since the turn of the 21st century almost 1 in 50 of the remaining mangrove forests has been cut down. 20% of the world’s mangrove forests have disappeared since 1980 according to a new study by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Mongabay is a reader-supported conservation and environmental science news service. Fifty percent of the world’s mangroves have disappeared in the past half-century, victims of rising sea levels; oil spills and other pollution; demand for timber; and clearing to make way for shrimp and crab fishing, coastal infrastructure, and urban expansion. You may republish Mongabay content in your publication at no cost, Fueled by impunity, invasions surge in Brazil’s Indigenous lands, Chinese demand and domestic instability are wiping out Senegal’s last forests, Solomon Islands environmental defender faces life sentence for arson charge, ‘Tamper with nature, and everyone suffers’: Q&A with ecologist Enric Sala, New paper highlights spread of organized crime from global fisheries, Study: Chinese ‘dark fleets’ illegally defying sanctions by fishing in North Korean waters, Game changer? D. 475,000. Their location combined with their low perceived value makes mangrove forests prime targets for for development. It is characterized by low tree diversity, almost exclusively mangroves, with a low broken canopy. Read about the Mangrove importance, cover and conservation in India. Mongabay is a U.S.-based non-profit conservation and environmental science news platform. Although human pressures are a major threat, little is known about the governance conditions that facilitate long-term conservation and restoration […] Between 2000 and 2012, more than 720,000 square miles (2 million square km) of forests around the world were cut down — an area about the size of all the states east of the Mississippi River. 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More than a third of the world’s mangroves are believed to have disappeared between 1980 and 2000, mostly due to the rise of industrial shrimp farming and coastal development. At this rate all unprotected mangroves could disappear in the next century. Although human pressures are a major threat, little is known about the governance conditions that facilitate long-term conservation and restoration […] How many people were killed in the boxing day tsunami? Twenty percent of the world’s mangroves lost over the last 25 years: Rate of deforestation slowing, but still a cause for alarm And every year we lose roughly another 1 percent. Fifty percent of the world’s mangroves have disappeared in the past 40 years, according to UNESCO, and continue to be destroyed and degraded by about 1% per year. The unexpected decline in this unique coastland habitat is revealed by the first global satellite survey of mangroves, which grow in intertidal regions of the tropics and subtropics. One important function of mangroves is to serve as spawning grounds and nurseries for fish and shellfish and they play an important role in the marine foodweb. Antarctic ice melt related to tropical weather shifts: Study, Crimefighting NGO tracks Brazil wildlife trade on WhatsApp and Facebook, The Amazon’s Yanomami utterly abandoned by Brazilian authorities: Report, Conserve freshwater or land biodiversity? Mangroves help prevent and reduce coastal erosion, providing nearby communities with protection against the effects of wind, waves and water currents. However, they happen to be the most carbon-rich type of forest in the tropics. Still, during the same time frame the annual rate of mangrove deforestation dropped from around 185 000 ha per year in the 1980s to 105 000 ha/yr during the 2000-2005 period, it added. 7. hbspt.cta.load(5981609, '6e487f3c-9666-4c8e-b87d-3111d3ccada2', {}); {amount} donation plus {fee_amount} to help cover fees. Sundarbans is the largest mangrove forest in the world. Thailand has lost 84 percent of its mangroves, the highest rate of mangrove loss of any nation, while the Ivory Coast, Guinea-Bissau, Tanzania, Mexico, Panama, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, and the Philippines have each lost more than 60 percent of their mangrove forests. Despite their wide-ranging benefits and importance, mangroves are being destroyed and degraded at an alarming rate. In some areas (e.g. Here's what makes them different: 1. A study commissioned by the U.N. Environmental Program (UNEP) reports that one fifth (around 35,500 square kilometers) of the world's mangroves -- forests straddling both land and sea -- have … Yet those forests have been cut in half in the past three decades, shrinking from 4.2 million hectares in 1982 to 2 million in 2000. In addition, a variety of fish and other sea creatures thrive among the submerged mangrove roots, providing a critical food source for Kolkata's four million inhabitants. Around 20 percent of the world’s mangrove forests have disappeared during the past 25 years as a result of over-exploitation and conversion to other uses, according to a new FAO study. Indonesia, a country of 17,000 tropical islands, has by far the largest mangrove forest cover, followed by Brazil, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and Australia. (Ilka C. Feller/Smithsonian Institution, made possible by LightHawk) These include the provision of a large variety of wood and non-wood forest products; coastal protection against the effects of wind, waves and water currents; conservation of biological diversity – including a number of endangered mammals, reptiles, amphibians and birds; protection of coral reefs, sea grass beds and shipping lanes against siltation; an… 6. A. The collection, analysis and dissemination of information related to mangroves; development of awareness raising material, guidelines and case studies on best practices in mangrove conservation, management and sustainable utilization; Provision of a neutral forum for technical and policy discussions including support to the international dialogue on forests and promotion of international cooperation; Provision of technical and policy advice to governments on conservation and sustainable utilization of mangrove ecosystems and their resources; Institutional strengthening and capacity building - including direct development assistance via an extensive field programme (more than 60 mangrove-related mangrove projects in 35 different countries over the last 30 years). “Other studies suggest that the number of Sundarbans mangroves has remained stable or decreased very slightly over the last few decades, and this is also what we found,” said Awty-Carroll.