But, Metamorphoses is also a compilation of myths, some complimentary and some almost contradictory, that were well-known in Ovid's society. Share with students that artists often interpret stories from the past in original works of art. This line establishes one of the main themes of the poem, transformation, and links it to the gods. Metamorphoses or Transformations refers to the change of shape and form of the characters of the poem. "Metamorphoses" means transformations, and transformation is the governming theme of the text. RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone). The title of the poem means 'transformation', and this is a major theme throughout the work. What questions might a scholar want to ask if he or she discovered a fragment? Read the original German text in the article "And Yet Another Archaic Torso—Why?" (She prays to her father, a river god, that her purity remain intact and that her beauty be destroyed. Have students consider the following: Nudity in art was reserved for mythological subjects, with the gods and goddesses nude as compared to clothed humanity. Distribute copies of "Daphne and Phoebus" to your students. Simultaneously, however, the nudity distances the deity from the mortal (clothed/cultured) experience, especially when the nude form suggests an idealized, immortal beauty. Extension The popularity and timelessness of this work stems from the manner of story telling. 3. 4. • interpret and compare literary and visual works of art. Have students consider the following: Throughout the story, he takes beliefs that were significant at the time, and mocks them through the theme of transformation. 6. Transformations in the Metamorphoses flow from the pursuit of or effects rendered by love. • Artists can use strong light and shadow side by side to draw attention to important details in a scene. In addition to the idea of divine retribution, Ovid also plays with the theme of mortal daring, for it is by vexing Juno and rejecting nymphs that lead Echo and Narcissus to their respective punishments. • What does their body language suggest to you? (The arrow transformed the usually sober character of Apollo into a lustful pursuant of the chaste nymph. 1. Open a discussion with students about the drawing, using the following questions: • What is happening in the poem? In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. Ovid takes stories relevant to his culture and time period, and weaves them together into one work with a connecting theme of transformation throughout. “Metamorphoses” is often called a mock-epic, as it is written in dactylic hexameter (the form of the great epic poems of the ancient tradition, such as “The Iliad”, “The Odyssey” and “The Aeneid”), unlike Ovid‘s other works. SL.CCR.1 Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. This type of poem may open with one idea—an argument—that may come to resolution by the end, a traditional transformation in sonnets. • Copies of the poem "Archaic Torso of Apollo," by Rainer Maria Rilke, translated by Stephen Mitchell (available on the Academy of American Poets Web site at R.CCR.10. http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5791.) • Refer to Poetry and Music in Antiquity to evaluate how Apollo is portrayed in other tales. At the same time, however, a lead arrow struck the nymph, turning her feelings to those of revulsion.) Have students write a poem that describes a transformation they've experienced. The nudity brings the deity into the realm of human emotion, experience, and expression, since the body is recognizable to the viewer. Give students time to address their peers' feedback. The transformation theme unifies the episodes of the book. • Diagonal lines suggest movement and drama. A study in the transformations of a literary symbol Item Preview remove-circle Share or Embed This Item. Metamorphoses Book 3: Pentheus and Bacchus. It was written in epic metre but instead of focussing on a unified epic narrative, it collects together a large number of self-contained stories, including the tales of Daphne and Apollo, Diana and Actaeon, Daedalus and Icarus, Orpheus and Euridice, Achilles, Midas and many more. They then write an original poem that explores the theme of transformation. • What motivates each of the main characters? Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9—12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. Discuss the story with the following prompts: transformations in ovid’s metamorphoses [This list has been prepared by Ian Johnston, Vancouver Island University, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada. The nudity brings the deity into the realm of human emotion, experience, and expression, since the body is recognizable to the viewer. (The arrow transformed the usually sober character of Apollo into a lustful pursuant of the chaste nymph. • Copies of the poem "Archaic Torso of Apollo," by Rainer Maria Rilke, translated by Stephen Mitchell (available on the Academy of American Poets Web site at Free, fun, and packed with easy-to-understand explanations! The theme is presented in the opening lines of the poem, where the poet invokes the gods who are responsible for the changes to look favorably on his efforts to compose. (Point out that the speaker uses simile ["eyes like ripening fruit; "torso...like a lamp"] and hyperbole ["suffused with brilliance from inside"].) R.CCR.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Have partners discuss the poems by responding to the following questions: Inform students that the god Apollo was called by different names, depending on which role or duty he was fulfilling in a story. 3 With each passing generation, Ovid’s popular book was used in new ways and meant ... a recurrent theme in the Metamorphoses: the gods taking mortal girls as lovers. There are calls for Ovid's Metamorphoses to be taught with a trigger warning. Landscape in Ovid's Metamorphoses. The work is a collection of mythological and legendary stories, many taken from Greek sources, in which transformation (metamorphosis) plays a role, however minor. • Use simile and hyperbole to describe the experience. (He fashions some leaves from the tree in the form of a crown to wear upon his head to remember his love for Daphne.) (A speaker expresses his thoughts while experiencing a fragment of an ancient sculpture. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. In part two, students read an ekphrastic poem by Rainer Maria Rilke and study a related work of art. Metamorphoses, poem in 15 books, written in Latin about 8 CE by Ovid. It is usually the cause of whatever transformation the stories are explaining. Part Two: Ekphrasis and Rilke's Poetry Time Required: 3–5–Part Lesson Simultaneously, however, the nudity distances the deity from the mortal (clothed/cultured) experience, especially when the nude form suggests an idealized, immortal beauty. It is extremely rare to have a full history of any work of art, particularly fragments.) • How would you interpret the characters' expressions? Permissions: The lesson plan and downloadable materials on this page are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. In part one, students explore the theme of transformation in text and art by reading the story of Apollo and Daphne from Ovid's Metamorphoses and studying works of art related to the poem. Use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast it with the fragment of Young Man. 2. The gods are always avenging themselves and changing mortals into animals or plants so that they can prove their own superiority. • What type of mood is suggested by the colors that are used? Many gods and goddesses emerge as individual, complex characters that are multifaceted and multidimensional entities, whether in singular works or across generations of poets' writings. Students will be able to: Transformations in Ovid Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid s Metamorphoses. Writing Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. • What do you think draws someone's attention to a fragmentary work of art (e.g., curiosity of what is unknown, space for the imagination, a barometer of time and loss)? Generally, the gods either grant transformations in response to prayers, but for those transformed unwillingly, the change was normally cast as a punishment. Many gods and goddesses emerge as individual, complex characters that are multifaceted and multidimensional entities, whether in singular works or across generations of poets' writings. That includes personal love or as the personified deity, Amor/Cupid. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. In the Metamorphoses Ovid retells stories from the Greek myths, arranging them in roughly chronological order, from the origins of the world to his own times. Clothing is one sign of culture, thus, nudity suggests the natural world rather than that of culture. The idea of transformation has long been a well-used theme in Western literature. Landscape in Ovid's Metamorphoses A study in the transformations of a literary symbol. 3. Open a discussion with your students by suggesting that sculptural art often presents characters isolated from the narrative context or setting. Display an image of Young Man and ask the following questions: Grades 11–12 Then ask for volunteers to take turns reading each paragraph aloud. After students have written their first drafts, invite them to share their poems with partners first. Can you locate diagonal lines throughout the composition? Then ask for volunteers to read their completed poems aloud to the class. • What type of mood is suggested by the colors that are used? Transformations from one shape or form into another are the central theme in Ovid’s Metamorphoses. In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, the story of Philomela’s rape and suppression of speech by Tereus reflects similar gender patterns of male domination that are found throughout classical literature.The story of Philomela is especially important because it reflects the difficulty people have talking about events that have silenced them. Challenge them to take the reader through the experience from a description to an emotional, reflective, or philosophical impact. In part two, students read an ekphrastic poem by Rainer Maria Rilke and study a related work of art. RL.11-12.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of Metamorphoses and what it means. on the Jacket Magazine Web site at http://jacketmagazine.com/36/beck-rilke-torso.shtml. • Inform students that many objects from the ancient world are fragmentary due to the ravages of time, the elements, and human intervention. 4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context, The Theme of Transformation in Poetry: Ovid's Metamorphoses, Exploring Art of the Ancient World at the Getty Villa, Assessing Online Resources for K-12 Teachers, Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, http://www.theoi.com/Text/OvidMetamorphoses1.html#6, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15814, http://jacketmagazine.com/36/beck-rilke-torso.shtml, http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/5791.